Lychgate Press
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Lychgate Press is a small, specialty publishing company with particular interest in fiction and nonfiction books about or set in the Pacific Northwest, and new editions of books of lasting merit that have gone out of print. Our most recent releases include Gripper, a new mystery by Ashna Graves set in Oregon,  In the Keep of Time,  a new edition of a juvenile novel by Margaret J. Anderson first published by Knopf in 1977 that is the first book in a time-slip trilogy, Life with Jake, A Father's Story, a memoir by Bay Area writer Kirby Wilkins about raising a son with cerebral palsy, and Burying Betty Lee Berto, short stories by Wendy Madar.

Books due out in late 2016 includeA Bit of Earth, essays by Wendy Crisp Lestina, and To Nowhere and Back, a new edition of a juvenile novel by Margaret J. Anderson that is the second book in a trilogy.

Lychgate Press urges readers to buy books through their local independent bookstores. Books also are available directly from this website for each book listed and (for bookstores only) from Partners West Book Distributing, Inc. (1-800-563-2385), as well as from the usual online booksellers. Please contact us with questions or to order books: edtior@lychgatepress.com. 

NEWEST RELEASES

Gripper cover

GRIPPER 

The dark side of college championship sports hits the news far too often, highlighting a world of driven coaches, academic cheating, rule-breaking boosters, and failed dreams. In a new mystery by Ashna Graves, author of the acclaimed Death Pans Out, the murder of a star basketball forward propels journalist Neva Leopold into the troubled heart of  this deeply competitive world. The boosters “want to touch us, they want to put their hands on us, to feel our muscles,” player Frankie Budd tells Neva, his hand cinching tight on her shoulder. “That’s why we call them grippers. That’s why I hate the bastards. That’s why I took everything I could get.” Cars, cash, housing, travel, clothes, passing grades—the players get it all while they’re hot. But when it’s over, when the scholarships end and 98.8% of the players fail to make the NBA draft, what happens then?  What happens when they go from being heroes to nobodies overnight and find themselves wielding a broom instead of a basketball? Is such a downfall grounds for murder? Or is the gripper situation at PAC-12 Conference member Valley State University a long way—a very long way—out of hand?

                                                       Gripper

        

 

IN THE KEEP OF TIME

With the turn of a glowing key, four children are transported back to the fifteenth century when they open the door to an ancient Scottish tower. Back then border raiding was a way of life and Andrew witnesses the battle to retake Roxburgh Castle from the English. On a second visit, hoping to retrieve Ollie, the youngest child, they find themselves in the distant future. The book was first published in 1977 by Knopf and has been out of print for some years. Author Margaret Anderson was born and educated in Scotland, and graduated from Edinburgh University. Before she took up writing for children she worked as a biologist and statistician. She is the author of twenty-five books ranging from nature activity and biographies of famous scientists to historical fiction.  In the Keep of Time is the first book in a time-slip trilogy.

 

 

Life with Jake

 LIFE WITH JAKE, A FATHER'S STORY

An intimate, moving, often funny portrait of the relationship between an older father, Kirby Wilkins, and his disabled son, Jake. A saga of day-to-day challenges, large and small triumphs, friendship, adventure, devotion, and love written by Wilkins, a long-time creative writing teacher at Cabrillo College in Santa Cruz, California. Wilkins is the author of a book of short stories and two novels. For people who have been there, this book will ring true. For those who haven’t, Life with Jake will take them on a journey they won’t soon forget.

Life with Jake

 

 

 

Bett Lee cover

 BURYING BETTY LEE BERTO

In this new collection of thirteen stories, Wendy Madar writes about fundamental aspects of human life--marriage, poverty, death, parenthood--with a touch that can seem light and even humorous. But the stories build, leaving the reader with a deep sense of the complexity of relationships, whether as casual as that between a supermarket checker and a customer buying ketchup or as potently tangled as that between an aging intellectual and his wife of many years, who lies dead in the back of the family station wagon awaiting disposal.  No life is simple, no life is easily categorized as good or bad. And no incident is trivial when encountered through such clear and revealing prose.

Burying Betty Lee Berto